Sep 2, 2014
Sep 2, 2014
Sep 2, 2014
skutcka:

A little fog a little fog, a little sun . All and all a great day!

skutcka:

A little fog a little fog, a little sun . All and all a great day!

(via thanksforthelovemke)

Sep 2, 2014

Eric Garner RIP

The Rev. Al Sharpton on Saturday joined family members of a Staten Island man who died in police custody, in a rally calling for a full investigation.

Sharpton was joined by family members of Eric Garner, 43, at the National Action Network on West 145th Street.

A second rally was also held at the Mount Sinai Center for Community Enrichment on Jersey Street in Staten Island, followed by a march to the 120th Precinct police station, CBS 2′s Scott Rapoport reported.

An overcome Esaw Garner was escorted from the Rev. Al Sharpton’s National Action Network headquarters in Harlem, which was packed with hundreds of people. But Sharpton said Thursday’s death of 43-year-old Eric Garner while in custody could strain the black community’s relationship with the New York Police Department.

"This is going to be a real test to see where policies are in the city now and whether the change that we feel occurred has occurred," Sharpton said, referring to promises made by Mayor Bill de Blasio and Police Commissioner William Bratton to improve the relationship between officers and the city’s minority communities. "We are the only ones in the social setup that has to deal with fear of cops and robbers."

Garner, who was black, was confronted by police trying to arrest him on suspicion of selling untaxed, loose cigarettes on a Staten Island sidewalk, authorities said. The 6-foot-3, 350-pound Garner became irate, denying the charges and refusing to be handcuffed before one of the officers placed him in what Bratton said appeared to be a chokehold, according to partial video of the encounter obtained by the New York Daily News.

The tactic, which can be fatal, is prohibited by departmental policy.

Ramsey Orta, who recorded a cell phone video of Garner’s arrest, told 1010 WINS’ Gary Baumgarten he was worried the officers would turn on him for recording it.

Orta added that he’s happy he shot the video because “Now justice can be served.”

He said he believes had he not captured the arrest on video, there would be no investigation.

“It would have been swept right under the rug, right under the rug,” Orta said. “Ain’t nothing would of happened.”

Commissioner Bratton said on Friday the incident would be investigated within the NYPD.

“Choke holds are in fact prohibited by the New York City Police Department because of the concerns of potential death arising from them,” Bratton said.

A criminal investigation and an internal NYPD probe have been launched following Garner’s death. He does have a record of more than 30 arrests – mostly misdemeanors – for selling illegal cigarettes.

Esaw Garner earlier said she thought it was no excuse for the way her husband was treated. Their family has been left to care for six children without their father.

“My son, my son is missing his dad. He’s leaving for college on Aug. 5 on a full scholarship in basketball and his father didn’t get to see him,” she said.

1. Esaw Garner holds pic of her late husband as she sits with sons Emery (l.) and Eric. “They wouldn’t tell me anything,” she said of cops.

2. Mourners are pictured near chalk writing and a memorial on Bay Street where Eric Garner was killed after police went to arrest the 43-year-old man for selling untaxed cigarettes. Members of the Tompkinsville community say the harrassment by NYPD is becoming almost routine and do not feel safe. Friday July 18, 2014. (Staten Island Advance/Anthony DePrimo)

3. Dozens of mourners gathered near a memorial on Bay Street where Eric Garner was killed on Friday July 18, 2014. (Staten Island Advance/Anthony DePrimo)

4.Friends and members of the community gathered in Tompkinsville to mourn the loss of neighborhood fixture, Eric Garner.Friday July 18, 2014. (Staten Island Advance/Anthony DePrimo)

5. Protesters gather to chant slogans in front of the 120th police precinct in St. George in response to the death of Eric “Big E” Garner. Garner died while being arrested by NYPD on Thursday. Saturday July 19, 2014. (Staten Island Advance/Anthony DePrimo)

6. Hundreds of protesters march down Victory Boulevard in Tompkinsville and chant slogans with Rev. Al Sharpton to make their way to the 120th police precinct in St. George. July 19, 2014. (Staten Island Advance/Anthony DePrimo)

7. A sign quotes the last words uttered by Eric Garner as protesters gather in front of the 120th police precinct in St. George in response to the death of Eric “Big E” Garner. Garner died while being arrested by NYPD on Thursday. Saturday July 19, 2014. (Staten Island Advance/Anthony DePrimo)

8. Esaw Garner, wife of Eric Garner, breaks down in the arms of Rev. Herbert Daughtry, center, and Rev. Al Sharpton, right, during a rally at the National Action Network headquarters for Eric Garner, Saturday, July 19, 2014, in New York. Garner, 43, died Thursday, during an arrest in Staten Island, when a plain-clothes police officer placed him in what appeared be a choke hold while several others brought him to the ground and struggled to place him in handcuffs. JOHN MINCHILLO — AP Photo

(Source: merosezah, via america-wakiewakie)

Sep 2, 2014
therunwaylife:

#RIPEricGarner

therunwaylife:

#RIPEricGarner

(via america-wakiewakie)

Sep 2, 2014
thepeoplesrecord:

On Ferguson: To be relevant is to be powerfulSeptember 2, 2014
The murder of Michael Brown by the Ferguson Police creates an opportunity for millions of people to confront the tragic and mundane daily realities of White Supremacy and Anti-Blackness, which are part of everyday public and private life for so many people in this country. It is imperative to rethink the spectacle that has been created out of Ferguson, and to contextualize it within as many structural realities of racism that we can comprehend. In the past three decades, we’ve seen patterns of racist violence continue in America. Less than 25 years ago, we saw L.A. Police excessively chase and beat Rodney King, and the racially charged riots that followed. Now, we see Ferguson. Less than ten years ago, we heard “I am Oscar Grant” (after Oscar Grant III was fatally shot by BART police in Oakland). Now, we hear Ferguson. Less than 5 years ago, we saw the largest police department in the U.S.A employ racist Stop and Frisk Policing tactics, and the enormous campaigns that rallied against those tactics. Now, we rally around Ferguson. Less than 3 years ago, we saw millions of Black and Brown youth wearing hoodies declaring, “my skin color is not a crime,” in honor of Trayvon Martin. Now, we honor the memory of Michael Brown. And Ferguson. Less than a week after we saw protests in Ferguson, we saw the police killing Kajieme Powell just blocks away. This is not to compare the lives of our fallen brothers and sisters. May they rest in peace in a heaven of liberation. May their families know that their pain is important. It’s just as important as analyzing why local police departments get millions of dollars to purchase military weapons from the equivalent of the U.S. Military’s Goodwill Store, and analyzing why we don’t see the police kill White young people in the same way. These are two different ways of recognizing the trauma inflicted on those directly affected by White Supremacy; they are equally necessary in resisting the cruel and unusual force being used against People of Color by the U.S.A. 
We must look at Ferguson as another battle of resistance to make People of Color relevant to the redistribution of power in the United States. The 13th Amendment was a work in progress from when the first person was abducted from Africa and deposited as property, and not as a person, in the eyes of the United States of America. The implementation of the 13th amendment to end slavery is still in process. We need to recognize the difference between a true end to slavery and the mutations of slavery that we currently live in. The creation of capital through the killing of the Black body became slavery. During Reconstruction, a sense of solidarity grew between “freed” Black people and poor White people. Jim Crow made segregation laws to enforce that even the poorest White person was still not Black in the eyes of the U.S.A. The rise of mass incarceration has been driven by the same mechanism that drove slavery — the creation of capital through racism. The United States incarcerates more people than any other country in the world, and non-White people are incarcerated at rates much higher than White people for all crimes, especially non-violent and petty crimes. This all only took approximately 400 years to create in this country. Dismantling this reality is not only going to take a long time but will also require numerous acts of resistance. 
Public education likes to declare that the Civil Rights movement was a victory. In fact, 50 years after the Civil Rights Act, Black men are nearly right where they started economically, but with a very high incarceration rate. A person does not just end up in prison as an exchange for an alleged crime. Our incarceration rates start with police forces. Cops (Constables on Patrol), originated in the U.S.A. as brigades of (White) people who surveilled both public and private property and searched for “runaway slaves.” Slaves were considered property of a slave owner, and if they fled for freedom they were “runaway property.” Eventually, there was too much work for these private slave brigades so every level of government in this country began to fund these patrols. These patrols became police departments. The police were not established as a response to public safety. The police were not established to help people in bad relationships, or to solve problems between groups of people. The police were created as a response in order to protect property that was already stolen through the process of slavery, and keep it safe for self-declared slave owners. When a country is founded by slave owners and founded to declare their capital independent of Great Britain — when a country is built on slavery and colonialism — what else would be the plight of this country’s public institutions? 
Full article

thepeoplesrecord:

On Ferguson: To be relevant is to be powerful
September 2, 2014

The murder of Michael Brown by the Ferguson Police creates an opportunity for millions of people to confront the tragic and mundane daily realities of White Supremacy and Anti-Blackness, which are part of everyday public and private life for so many people in this country. It is imperative to rethink the spectacle that has been created out of Ferguson, and to contextualize it within as many structural realities of racism that we can comprehend. 

In the past three decades, we’ve seen patterns of racist violence continue in America. Less than 25 years ago, we saw L.A. Police excessively chase and beat Rodney King, and the racially charged riots that followed. Now, we see Ferguson. Less than ten years ago, we heard “I am Oscar Grant” (after Oscar Grant III was fatally shot by BART police in Oakland). Now, we hear Ferguson. Less than 5 years ago, we saw the largest police department in the U.S.A employ racist Stop and Frisk Policing tactics, and the enormous campaigns that rallied against those tactics. Now, we rally around Ferguson. Less than 3 years ago, we saw millions of Black and Brown youth wearing hoodies declaring, “my skin color is not a crime,” in honor of Trayvon Martin. Now, we honor the memory of Michael Brown. And Ferguson. 

Less than a week after we saw protests in Ferguson, we saw the police killing Kajieme Powell just blocks away. 

This is not to compare the lives of our fallen brothers and sisters. May they rest in peace in a heaven of liberation. May their families know that their pain is important. It’s just as important as analyzing why local police departments get millions of dollars to purchase military weapons from the equivalent of the U.S. Military’s Goodwill Store, and analyzing why we don’t see the police kill White young people in the same way. These are two different ways of recognizing the trauma inflicted on those directly affected by White Supremacy; they are equally necessary in resisting the cruel and unusual force being used against People of Color by the U.S.A. 

We must look at Ferguson as another battle of resistance to make People of Color relevant to the redistribution of power in the United States. The 13th Amendment was a work in progress from when the first person was abducted from Africa and deposited as property, and not as a person, in the eyes of the United States of America. The implementation of the 13th amendment to end slavery is still in process. We need to recognize the difference between a true end to slavery and the mutations of slavery that we currently live in. 

The creation of capital through the killing of the Black body became slavery. During Reconstruction, a sense of solidarity grew between “freed” Black people and poor White people. Jim Crow made segregation laws to enforce that even the poorest White person was still not Black in the eyes of the U.S.A. 

The rise of mass incarceration has been driven by the same mechanism that drove slavery — the creation of capital through racism. The United States incarcerates more people than any other country in the world, and non-White people are incarcerated at rates much higher than White people for all crimes, especially non-violent and petty crimes. This all only took approximately 400 years to create in this country. Dismantling this reality is not only going to take a long time but will also require numerous acts of resistance. 

Public education likes to declare that the Civil Rights movement was a victory. In fact, 50 years after the Civil Rights Act, Black men are nearly right where they started economically, but with a very high incarceration rate. 

A person does not just end up in prison as an exchange for an alleged crime. Our incarceration rates start with police forces. 

Cops (Constables on Patrol), originated in the U.S.A. as brigades of (White) people who surveilled both public and private property and searched for “runaway slaves.” Slaves were considered property of a slave owner, and if they fled for freedom they were “runaway property.” Eventually, there was too much work for these private slave brigades so every level of government in this country began to fund these patrols. These patrols became police departments. 

The police were not established as a response to public safety. The police were not established to help people in bad relationships, or to solve problems between groups of people. The police were created as a response in order to protect property that was already stolen through the process of slavery, and keep it safe for self-declared slave owners. When a country is founded by slave owners and founded to declare their capital independent of Great Britain — when a country is built on slavery and colonialism — what else would be the plight of this country’s public institutions? 

Full article

Sep 2, 2014
jupiter2:

What Your Body Looks Like Top To Bottom

jupiter2:

What Your Body Looks Like Top To Bottom

(via ovarytissue)

Aug 31, 2014

UN Condemns U.S. Police Brutality, Calls For 'Stand Your Ground' Review

sun-thief-rai:

questionall:

* Panel issues recommendations after review of U.S. record

* Says killing of Michael Brown “not an isolated event”

* Decries racial bias of police, pervasive discrimination

* ACLU calls for addressing racial inequality in America

GENEVA, Aug 29 (Reuters) - The U.N. racism watchdog urged the United States on Friday to halt the excessive use of force by police after the fatal shooting of an unarmed black teenager by a white policeman touched off riots in Ferguson, Missouri.

Minorities, particularly African Americans, are victims of disparities, the U.N. Committee on the Elimination of Racial Discrimination (CERD) said after examining the U.S. record.

"Racial and ethnic discrimination remains a serious and persistent problem in all areas of life from de facto school segregation, access to health care and housing," Noureddine Amir, CERD committee vice chairman, told a news briefing.

Teenager Michael Brown was shot dead by a white police officer on Aug. 9, triggering violent protests that rocked Ferguson - a St. Louis suburb - and shone a global spotlight on the state of race relations in America.

"The excessive use of force by law enforcement officials against racial and ethnic minorities is an ongoing issue of concern and particularly in light of the shooting of Michael Brown," said Amir, an expert from Algeria.

"This is not an isolated event and illustrates a bigger problem in the United States, such as racial bias among law enforcement officials, the lack of proper implementation of rules and regulations governing the use of force, and the inadequacy of training of law enforcement officials."

The panel of 18 independent experts grilled a senior U.S. delegation on Aug. 13 about what they said was persistent racial discrimination against African-Americans and other minorities, including within the criminal justice system.

U.S. Ambassador Keith Harper told the panel that his nation had made “great strides toward eliminating racial discrimination” but conceded that “we have much left to do”.

Ferguson Police Officer Darren Wilson, who shot Brown, has been put on paid leave and is in hiding. A St. Louis County grand jury has begun hearing evidence and the U.S. Justice Department has opened its own investigation.

Police have said Brown struggled with Wilson when shot. But some witnesses say Brown held up his hands and was surrendering when he was shot multiple times in the head and chest.

"STAND YOUR GROUND" LAWS

In its conclusions issued on Friday, the U.N. panel said “Stand Your Ground” Laws, a controversial self-defense statute in 22 U.S. states, should be reviewed to “remove far-reaching immunity and ensure strict adherence to principles of necessity and proportionality when deadly force is used for self-defense”.

Ron Davis, father of Jordan Davis, a 17-year-old shot dead in a car in Jacksonville, Florida during an argument over loud rap music in November 2012, attended the Geneva session. Sybrina Fulton, mother of Trayvon Martin, an unarmed black teen killed in Miami, Florida by a neighborhood watch volunteer, testified.

The U.N. panel monitors compliance with a treaty ratified by 177 countries including the United States.

"The Committee remains concerned at the practice of racial profiling of racial or ethnic minorities by law enforcement officials, including the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), Transportation Security Administration, border enforcement officials and local police," it said, urging investigations.

The experts called for addressing obstacles faced by minorities and indigenous peoples to exercise their right to vote effectively. This was due to restrictive voter identification laws, district gerrymandering and state-level laws that disenfranchise people convicted of felonies, it said.

Jamil Dakwar of the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) said the U.N. recommendations highlighted “shortcomings on racial equality that we are seeing play out today on our streets, at our borders and in the voting booth.

"When it comes to human rights, the United States must practice at home what it preaches abroad," he said.

THIS IS GOOD.

THIS IS REAL GOOD.

(via supersailormarx)

Aug 31, 2014
necessaryveganism:


Currently nearly half of all US land is already dedicated to animal agriculture. If we were to switch over to grass-fed beef it would require clearing every square inch of the US, up into Canada, all of Central America and well into South America. (this includes all mountains, forests and cities)
And this is just to feed the United States’ demand on meat. 

Animal agriculture of any kind is unsustainable and inhumane. The only Earth, human and animal friendly decision you can make is to go vegan
- Cowspiracy: The Sustainability Secret.

necessaryveganism:

Currently nearly half of all US land is already dedicated to animal agriculture. If we were to switch over to grass-fed beef it would require clearing every square inch of the US, up into Canada, all of Central America and well into South America. (this includes all mountains, forests and cities)

And this is just to feed the United States’ demand on meat. 

Animal agriculture of any kind is unsustainable and inhumane. The only Earth, human and animal friendly decision you can make is to go vegan

Cowspiracy: The Sustainability Secret.

(via america-wakiewakie)

Aug 31, 2014
amnhnyc:


How did the moon form? The leading theory is that the Moon resulted from a glancing collision between the young Earth and an object the size of Mars. The above image series is based on several mathematical simulations of the Moon’s origin:
The Moon’s history begins with a collision between a young Earth (larger object) and a Mars-sized planet.
10 minutes: The now-molten mantle layers (gray) of the two planets are mixing together.
1 hour: The iron cores (orange) are melding together – Most of this iron will remain with Earth.
2 hours: Parts of the mantle are spinning off into a swarm of debris.
22 hours: Pieces of debris revolve around Earth, slowly gathering together.
1 week: The growing Moon’s gravity pulls in the remaining debris.
Learn more about Moon rocks and craters.

amnhnyc:

How did the moon form? The leading theory is that the Moon resulted from a glancing collision between the young Earth and an object the size of Mars. The above image series is based on several mathematical simulations of the Moon’s origin:

The Moon’s history begins with a collision between a young Earth (larger object) and a Mars-sized planet.

10 minutes: The now-molten mantle layers (gray) of the two planets are mixing together.

1 hour: The iron cores (orange) are melding together – Most of this iron will remain with Earth.

2 hours: Parts of the mantle are spinning off into a swarm of debris.

22 hours: Pieces of debris revolve around Earth, slowly gathering together.

1 week: The growing Moon’s gravity pulls in the remaining debris.

Learn more about Moon rocks and craters.

(via afro-dominicano)

Aug 31, 2014

majiinboo:

  • Do not forget Michael Brown
  • Do not forget how the media dehumanized him and tried to justify his murder
  • Do not forget how peaceful protests were painted as savage riots
  • Do not forget police armed with military grade weapons terrorized and arrested black civilians
  • Do not forget Darren Wilson being awarded over $200,000 in fundraiser donations for murdering an unarmed black child
  • Do not forget that this system was not built to defend us, but to control us
  • Do not forget Ferguson 

(via afro-dominicano)

Aug 31, 2014

zacharielaughingalonewithsalad:

cellarspider:

twinkletwinkleyoulittlefuck:

purrsianstuck:

During the Bubonic Plague, doctors wore these bird-like masks to avoid becoming sick. They would fill the beaks with spices and rose petals, so they wouldn’t have to smell the rotting bodies. 

A theory during the Bubonic Plague was that the plague was caused by evil spirits. To scare the spirits away, the masks were intentionally designed to be creepy. 

Mission fucking accomplished

Okay so I love this but it doesn’t cover the half of why the design is awesome and actually borders on making sense.

It wasn’t just that they didn’t want to smell the infected and dead, they thought it was crucial to protecting themselves. They had no way of knowing about what actually caused the plague, and so one of the other theories was that the smell of the infected all by itself was evil and could transmit the plague. So not only would they fill their masks with aromatic herbs and flowers, they would also burn fires in public areas, so that the smell of the smoke would “clear the air”. This all related to the miasma theory of contagion, which was one of the major theories out there until the 19th century. And it makes sense, in a way. Plague victims smelled awful, and there’s a general correlation between horrible septic smells and getting horribly sick if you’re around what causes them for too long.

You can see now that we’ve got two different theories as to what caused the plague that were worked into the design. That’s because the whole thing was an attempt by the doctors to cover as many bases as they could think of, and we’re still not done.

The glass eyepieces. They were either darkened or red, not something you generally want to have to contend with when examining patients. But the plague might be spread by eye contact via the evil eye, so best to ward that off too.

The illustration shows a doctor holding a stick. This was an examination tool, that helped the doctors keep some distance between themselves and the infected. They already had gloves on, but the extra level of separation was apparently deemed necessary. You could even take a pulse with it. Or keep people the fuck away from you, which was apparently a documented use.

Finally, the robe. It’s not just to look fancy, the cloth was waxed, as were all of the rest of their clothes. What’s one of the properties of wax? Water-based fluids aren’t absorbed by it. This was the closest you could get to a sterile, fully protecting garment back then. Because at least one person along the line was smart enough to think “Gee, I’d really rather not have the stuff coming out of those weeping sores anywhere on my person”.

So between all of these there’s a real sense that a lot of real thought was put into making sure the doctors were protected, even if they couldn’t exactly be sure from what. They worked with what information they had. And frankly, it’s a great design given what was available! You limit exposure to aspirated liquids, limit exposure to contaminated liquids already present, you limit contact with the infected. You also don’t give fleas any really good place to hop onto. That’s actually useful.

Beyond that, there were contracts the doctors would sign before they even got near a patient. They were to be under quarantine themselves, they wouldn’t treat patients without a custodian monitoring them and helping when something had to be physically contacted, and they would not treat non-plague patients for the duration. There was an actual system in place by the time the plague doctors really became a thing to make sure they didn’t infect anyone either.

These guys were the product of the scientific process at work, and the scientific process made a bitchin’ proto-hazmat suit. And containment protocols!

reblogging for the sweet history lesson

(via microculture)

Aug 31, 2014

viele-katzen:

marina-and-the-dragons:

spread-hope-inspire:

Tribute to Steve Irwin, a guy who genuinely loved nature and animals.

This man was beyond real

"Crocodiles are easy. They try to kill and eat you. People are harder. Sometimes they pretend to be your friend first."
- Steve Irwin (r.i.p.)

(via cathairforever)

Aug 28, 2014

progressivefriends:

huffingtonpost:

Jon Stewart’s Priceless Response To Fox News On Ferguson

Jon Stewart is back from vacation, and he’s not wasting any time going after one of his favorite targets: Fox News.

Watch his the full brilliant 10  minute monologue on racism and Ferguson  here. 

Jon was spot on

(via supersailormarx)

Aug 28, 2014
Navigate
« To the past Page 1 of 245
About
Jarrett. Twenty One. Type 1 Diabetic. Wisconsin. Subscribe via RSS.